Images taken on Harris and Lewis

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Lewis

Confusingly, 'Lewis' and 'Harris' share the same island! The most remarkable feature of Lewis (the northern part) is the collection of standing stones at Calanais (or Callanish in English). I am using mostly gaelic names here as that is the local practice. 

Sunburst at Calanais
Sunburst at Calanais
Calanais Sunrise
Calanais Sunrise
Calanais Trio
Calanais Trio
Notched Stone
Notched Stone
Calanais Sunset
Sunset Clouds at Calanais
Calanais (or Callanish) is a magical place. The standing stones are justly famous, and we found that both sunrise and sunset worked wonderfully when we visited in early October. However, we were really lucky with the weather!
 
The sunrise and sunset shots are the most dramatic, but in some ways I find 'Calanais Trio' the most atmospheric - somehow it seems to capture the stones' mystery. I liked the way the 'notched stone' is echoed by the stone behind it, which appears a bit like a stumpy tooth!
Tranquility at Calanais
Tranquility at Calanais
Into the Light
Into the Light
One morning, instead of photographing the stones again, I turned my attending to the sea lochan (Loch Ceann Hulabhig) that lies just a short walkdown from the Visitor Centre. Again, the effect of the mist was magical, and I was particularly drawn to the burning intensity of the light in the little boat's cabin window.
Traigh na Beirigh
Traigh na Beirigh
Waterweed
Waterweed
There are, of course, plenty of other superb locations in Lewis. While it is Harris that is particularly famous for great stretches of white sand, Lewis has a few smaller examples of its own, including Traigh na Beirigh, near Bhaltos.
'Waterweed' was taken in a stream leading down to the beach at Dail Beag.

Harris
Abandoned cottage, Manais
Abandoned cottage, Manais
While sandy beaches are a feature of the West coast of Harris, the East coast is full of facinating old harbours and sea inlets, as shown in this example.